Dining Dangers at your Holiday Feast

Dining Dangers at your Family Feast

How safe are you and your family at your holiday meal?

 

Sad but true, NextCare Urgent Care facilities across the nation see a major increase in the number of food-borne-illness-related diagnoses between Thanksgiving and New Years. Food Poisoning, Airborne Contagions, Viruses and Bacteria are just a few of the serious risks that you may encounter when you and your family get together for the annual holiday meal. Use the slider below to get safety tips on how to avoid the most common illnesses and injuries when your family gets together this year.

Feeling ill? Call 888-381-4858 or visit your nearest NextCare location before the Winter holidays and avoid any contamination to family or the food next week!

 

Slide Left and Right to See Dining Dangers in Action!

  • Before-<h3>1. Salmonella & Bacteria in the Turkey:</h3> Most persons infected with Salmonella develop diarrhea, fever, and abdominal cramps 12 to 72 hours after infection. The illness usually lasts 4 to 7 days, and most persons recover without treatment. However, in some persons, the diarrhea may be so severe that the patient needs to be hospitalized. <br> <b>Avoid Breeding Bacteria Before You Cook the Turkey: </b><br> According to a survey conducted by the American Dietetic Association, nearly one in three Americans (31 percent) typically thaws frozen meat on the kitchen counter, under hot water in the kitchen sink, or in the oven— all big food safety no-nos.<br> <b>DON’T UNDERCOOK THE BIRD:</b> It is important to cook your turkey to an internal temperature of 180 degrees Fahrenheit (F) to kill all of the salmonella bacteria. The only way to really know if a turkey is at the right temperature is to use a meat thermometer (insert the meat thermometer into the thickest part of the muscle away from the bone). <br>
    After-<h3>1. Salmonella & Bacteria in the Turkey:</h3> Most persons infected with Salmonella develop diarrhea, fever, and abdominal cramps 12 to 72 hours after infection. The illness usually lasts 4 to 7 days, and most persons recover without treatment. However, in some persons, the diarrhea may be so severe that the patient needs to be hospitalized. <br> <b>Avoid Breeding Bacteria Before You Cook the Turkey: </b><br> According to a survey conducted by the American Dietetic Association, nearly one in three Americans (31 percent) typically thaws frozen meat on the kitchen counter, under hot water in the kitchen sink, or in the oven— all big food safety no-nos.<br> <b>DON’T UNDERCOOK THE BIRD:</b> It is important to cook your turkey to an internal temperature of 180 degrees Fahrenheit (F) to kill all of the salmonella bacteria. The only way to really know if a turkey is at the right temperature is to use a meat thermometer (insert the meat thermometer into the thickest part of the muscle away from the bone). <br>
    Before

    1. Salmonella & Bacteria in the Turkey:

    Most persons infected with Salmonella develop diarrhea, fever, and abdominal cramps 12 to 72 hours after infection. The illness usually lasts 4 to 7 days, and most persons recover without treatment. However, in some persons, the diarrhea may be so severe that the patient needs to be hospitalized.
    Avoid Breeding Bacteria Before You Cook the Turkey:
    According to a survey conducted by the American Dietetic Association, nearly one in three Americans (31 percent) typically thaws frozen meat on the kitchen counter, under hot water in the kitchen sink, or in the oven— all big food safety no-nos.
    DON’T UNDERCOOK THE BIRD: It is important to cook your turkey to an internal temperature of 180 degrees Fahrenheit (F) to kill all of the salmonella bacteria. The only way to really know if a turkey is at the right temperature is to use a meat thermometer (insert the meat thermometer into the thickest part of the muscle away from the bone).
    After
  • Before-
    After-
    Before After
  • Before-<h3>3. Common Cold, Influenza & Norovirus</h3> Your sneezy Uncle Ed decided to join you for Thanksgiving this year. He does not know that he is contagious with the Common Cold virus. According to the CDC, most cough, cold and flu viruses are passed from person to person by respiratory droplets.  People with the flu virus can spread droplets to others up to about 6 feet away. Leaving your serving trays exposed will pass infected droplets after every sneeze. Have him cover his mouth when he sneezes and wash your hands often. Also, the CDC recommends that every adult get a Flu Shot to help prevent against the most common strains of Influenza.
    After-<h3>3. Common Cold, Influenza & Norovirus</h3> Your sneezy Uncle Ed decided to join you for Thanksgiving this year. He does not know that he is contagious with the Common Cold virus. According to the CDC, most cough, cold and flu viruses are passed from person to person by respiratory droplets.  People with the flu virus can spread droplets to others up to about 6 feet away. Leaving your serving trays exposed will pass infected droplets after every sneeze. Have him cover his mouth when he sneezes and wash your hands often. Also, the CDC recommends that every adult get a Flu Shot to help prevent against the most common strains of Influenza.
    Before

    3. Common Cold, Influenza & Norovirus

    Your sneezy Uncle Ed decided to join you for Thanksgiving this year. He does not know that he is contagious with the Common Cold virus. According to the CDC, most cough, cold and flu viruses are passed from person to person by respiratory droplets. People with the flu virus can spread droplets to others up to about 6 feet away. Leaving your serving trays exposed will pass infected droplets after every sneeze. Have him cover his mouth when he sneezes and wash your hands often. Also, the CDC recommends that every adult get a Flu Shot to help prevent against the most common strains of Influenza.
    After
  • Before-<h3> 4. E. coli from your Veggies</h4> In recent years, however, outbreaks of foodborne illness linked to fruits and vegetables have become more common. These outbreaks come from produce grown both in the United States and in other countries. Thoroughly wash raw fruits and vegetables just before preparing or eating them. This not only helps remove dirt, bacteria and stubborn garden pests, but it also helps remove residual pesticides. Separate and individually rinse the leaves of spinach and lettuce. Peel potatoes, carrots, yams and other root vegetables, or clean them well with a firm scrub brush under lukewarm running water. Pat dry with paper towels.
    After-<h3> 4. E. coli from your Veggies</h4> In recent years, however, outbreaks of foodborne illness linked to fruits and vegetables have become more common. These outbreaks come from produce grown both in the United States and in other countries. Thoroughly wash raw fruits and vegetables just before preparing or eating them. This not only helps remove dirt, bacteria and stubborn garden pests, but it also helps remove residual pesticides. Separate and individually rinse the leaves of spinach and lettuce. Peel potatoes, carrots, yams and other root vegetables, or clean them well with a firm scrub brush under lukewarm running water. Pat dry with paper towels.
    Before

    4. E. coli from your Veggies

    In recent years, however, outbreaks of foodborne illness linked to fruits and vegetables have become more common. These outbreaks come from produce grown both in the United States and in other countries. Thoroughly wash raw fruits and vegetables just before preparing or eating them. This not only helps remove dirt, bacteria and stubborn garden pests, but it also helps remove residual pesticides. Separate and individually rinse the leaves of spinach and lettuce. Peel potatoes, carrots, yams and other root vegetables, or clean them well with a firm scrub brush under lukewarm running water. Pat dry with paper towels.
    After
  • Before-
    After-
    Before After
  • Before-<h3> 6. Bacteria from Houseflies</h3> Common pest flies can and do create health-related problems on Thanksgiving. There are many disease organism associated with flies. They serve as carriers of disease agents due to their preference for feeding on human food, garbage and animal waste. Flies are known to carry bacteria and viruses that can cause diarrhea, food poisoning, eye infections, dysentary, cholera, typhoid fever, tuberculosis and parasitic worms like tapeworms. They transmit disease-causing organisms through their vomit, feces and other contaminated body parts. <br>
    After-<h3> 6. Bacteria from Houseflies</h3> Common pest flies can and do create health-related problems on Thanksgiving. There are many disease organism associated with flies. They serve as carriers of disease agents due to their preference for feeding on human food, garbage and animal waste. Flies are known to carry bacteria and viruses that can cause diarrhea, food poisoning, eye infections, dysentary, cholera, typhoid fever, tuberculosis and parasitic worms like tapeworms. They transmit disease-causing organisms through their vomit, feces and other contaminated body parts. <br>
    Before

    6. Bacteria from Houseflies

    Common pest flies can and do create health-related problems on Thanksgiving. There are many disease organism associated with flies. They serve as carriers of disease agents due to their preference for feeding on human food, garbage and animal waste. Flies are known to carry bacteria and viruses that can cause diarrhea, food poisoning, eye infections, dysentary, cholera, typhoid fever, tuberculosis and parasitic worms like tapeworms. They transmit disease-causing organisms through their vomit, feces and other contaminated body parts.
    After

 

 

Sources:

http://www.ext.colostate.edu/pubs/foodnut/09369.html

http://www.cdc.gov/salmonella/

http://www.foodsafety.gov/poisoning/causes/bacteriaviruses/ecoli/index.html